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Friday, February 27 • 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Mapping the Past (AICP)

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Most GIS projects begin with collecting data, but a great many begin with referencing old maps and historical geography. This session will illuminate the historical map archives available in the state, as well as discuss a practical approach for historical map research.

  • Archival Land Records as GIS Data: Research on the Indian Trading Path and Colonial Settlement
             Dr. Rebecca Dobbs
    The versatility of GIS provides opportunities to turn almost anything into geospatial data. In my work on the Indian Trading Path and its influence on colonial settlement in the North Carolina Piedmont, archival 18th century land records from Granville District grants, held by the NC State Archives, formed the body of evidence used in addressing my research questions. In this presentation, I discuss technical issues involved in capturing and utilizing spatial and tabular data from such sources, issues of uncertainty in the project, and the uniquely effective visual output that can result from combining GIS analysis with archival data, including results from the project research.

  • Development of a Model to Predict the Alignment of Historic Transportation Routes
             Dale Loberger
    What should have been a simple process of rubbersheeting historical documents became a journey that ultimately led to the development of a weighted raster surface used with a pathing algorithm to define the probable alignment of past transportation routes. This presentation will cover the model creation as well as the results that demonstrate its usefulness and limitations in addition to suggestions for the next steps in its development.

  • Using Historic Maps in Research: A Case Study of Research in Burgundy France
             Amanda Tickner, Dr. Scott Madry
    This talk will discuss issues that arise when using historic maps in research such as scale, map quality, original map purpose, and historic cartography generally as they relate to placement within a GIS (georeferencing) and acquiring data from the GIS. Examples of how we have encountered these issues using the historic map based GIS in the Burgundy Landscape Working Group (members: Scott Madry, Elizabeth Jones, Seth Murray, website: http://burgundylandscapes.web.unc.edu/) will be presented as well general comments on the utility of interdisciplinary, non-spatial data in HGIS creation and use.


Moderators
avatar for Amy Keyworth

Amy Keyworth

Hydrogeologist, NC Dept. of Environment and Natural Resources

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Rebecca Dobbs

Dr. Rebecca Dobbs

Geography Instructor, Western Carolina University
Rebecca Dobbs holds a PhD in Geography from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where she also taught part-time for several years including courses in historical geography, practical GIS, and GIScience. She has published scholarly articles in Historical Geography and Social Science Computer Review about her research employing historical GIS. She currently teaches full-time at Western Carolina University.
avatar for Dale Loberger, GISP

Dale Loberger, GISP

Community Manager, Bradshaw Consulting Services
Mr. Loberger has always had a love for both history and maps, but never believed he could make a living with either of them so he started his career in forestry. His introduction to GIS back in 1984 was strictly practical, however his interest soon turned into a life-long passion. While he works primarily in public safety applications of GIS today, his imagination still seeks application of GIS to understand and communicate history through... Read More →
DS

Dr. Scott Madry

Research Associate Professor of Archaeology, UNC-Chapel Hill
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Research Laboratories of Archaeology and The International Space University
avatar for Dr. Amanda Tickner

Dr. Amanda Tickner

Research Assistant, UNC-Chapel Hill, University Library
PhD Anthropology UNC 2009 | Masters Library Science Candidate 2015, currently working in the Davis Library Research Hub | HGIS researcher since 2003 with the Burgundy Historical Landscapes Working Group


Friday February 27, 2015 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Room 306 A

Attendees (30)